The Manning-Rye Covered Bridge crosses the Palouse River outside of Colfax. It was constructed about 1918 by the Spokane and Inland Empire Railroad, an expansive interurban electric railroad line scheme that extended from the Palouse to Spokane. In contrast to most railroads, the electric railways could provide a frequent, rapid service with numerous stops. <br />
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Because it was most feasible to construct the electric railroads in well developed areas, the promoters focused on areas like the Palouse, rather than on areas that had no railroad service at all. By the summer of 1907, the electric line to Colfax was completed. Presumably, the Manning-Rye Covered Bridge replaced the original structure constructed over the Palouse River in 1907. The timber housing protects a single span timber Howe truss which rests on timber pile abutments, encased with timber cribs. Because it was necessary to provide for the connection between the locomotive and the overhead electric lines, the top of the bridge was left uncovered.  There are doors in the housing to provide access for the maintenance of the truss components. <br />
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The bridge eventually became the property of the Great Northern Railroad, and subsequently was owned by the Norther Pacific Railroad; it remained in use as a railroad bridge until 1967. In 1969 it was purchased by its present owner who saved the structure from demolition. At this time, the rails were replaced with wooden planking so that the present owner could use the structure for automobile access to her property. The Manning-Rye Bridge is one of four covered bridges remaining in Washington.<br />
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The bridge was added the National Register of Historic Places July 15, 1982.
  
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The Manning-Rye Covered Bridge crosses the Palouse River outside of Colfax. It was constructed about 1918 by the Spokane and Inland Empire Railroad, an expansive interurban electric railroad line scheme that extended from the Palouse to Spokane. In contrast to most railroads, the electric railways could provide a frequent, rapid service with numerous stops.

Because it was most feasible to construct the electric railroads in well developed areas, the promoters focused on areas like the Palouse, rather than on areas that had no railroad service at all. By the summer of 1907, the electric line to Colfax was completed. Presumably, the Manning-Rye Covered Bridge replaced the original structure constructed over the Palouse River in 1907. The timber housing protects a single span timber Howe truss which rests on timber pile abutments, encased with timber cribs. Because it was necessary to provide for the connection between the locomotive and the overhead electric lines, the top of the bridge was left uncovered. There are doors in the housing to provide access for the maintenance of the truss components.

The bridge eventually became the property of the Great Northern Railroad, and subsequently was owned by the Norther Pacific Railroad; it remained in use as a railroad bridge until 1967. In 1969 it was purchased by its present owner who saved the structure from demolition. At this time, the rails were replaced with wooden planking so that the present owner could use the structure for automobile access to her property. The Manning-Rye Bridge is one of four covered bridges remaining in Washington.

The bridge was added the National Register of Historic Places July 15, 1982.

Filename: Manning-Rye Covered Bridge 20160620-IMG_0507-HDR.jpg
Size: 4550x3033 / 11.0MB
Source:
Date 20 Jun 2016
Location: Colfax Washington United States
Credit:
Copyright: © Greg Disch Photography gdisch@gregdisch.com
Model Release: No
Property Release: No
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View This Image\'s Galleries: All Covered Bridges, All Images, All Palouse Photos, All Washington Photos, All Bridges
Keywords:
  • Bridges
  • Covered Bridge
  • National Register of Historic Places
  • Palouse
  • Railroad Bridge
  • United States
  • Washington

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